At the risk of putting our relationship on the line, I’ll admit to something deeply personal and compromising. I don’t didn’t like chocolate.

I didn’t even have a sweet tooth until a couple of years ago (which I chalk up to some desperate choices I made in Parisian patisseries, that sold light, airy nothings conspicuously hiding oodles of butter and chocolate). Actually, Apples and I survived most of Paris and Cote D’Azur on pain au chocolat. We spent a majority of that trip on foot, or in trains and hostels, backpacking from city to city, hungry to see the world. Meals were not our top priority, so corner bakeries and patisseries became a frequent stop. Somewhere in that timeframe, I started to develop a sweet tooth. I’m still not one to binge on sweets, but I can’t resist a sweet note after a meal. I’m what you could call a chocolate enthusiast now (heh!)

They say happiness is often directly proportional to the amount of chocolate your stock in your pantry. I’m not wholly opposed to that theory, it makes a lot of my friends and coworkers very happy when I bake with chocolate (and by happy, I mean crack dazed on a chocolate high). Chocolate is also a really interesting ingredient to work with, it pairs well with so many things and despite being temperamental, it has a deeply forgiving nature. It makes friends easily with fruits, herbs, nuts, savory elements and aromatics, making it a popular kid amongst all food groups.

I happened upon these truffles by accident when I was making chocolate-covered grapes one day. I was running out of chocolate and wanted to stretch my last little bit melting fast in a bain-marie setup. So I poured a little bit of heavy cream into the double boiler and my chocolate immediately reacted with the dairy and clumped up (also known as seizing). I didn’t want to waste the sticky goodness and ended up rolling them into bite-sized balls as they were cooling. It took some trial and error to get them just right and a few more iterations to understand how to incorporate flavors into them. The final product was insanely delicious; prime candidate to turn your love for chocolate into unsophisticated obsession.

To up the ante a bit, feel free to sensationalize your truffles with edible gold paint, funky additives like orange rinds, smoked sea-salt, chillis, pretzels or dried cranberries. Word of caution- moisture is not your friend when working with chocolate, so clean your hands and dry them well before hand-rolling the truffles.


Print Recipe
Ginger Sea-Salt Dark-Chocolate Truffles
Decadent dark chocolate truffles made with sea-salt and candied ginger to give you that sharp bite and savory punch amidst a swirl of dark chocolate ganache. What's more, they can be made in under 15 minutes!
Course Dessert
Cuisine French
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
truffles
Ingredients
Course Dessert
Cuisine French
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
truffles
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Line a baking tray with wax or parchment paper and set aside while water boils in your Bain-marie. Create a double-boiler setup if you don't have one. Double-boiler setup: Heat water in a pot and place a heat-proof bowl on top of it. Adjust the level of water so it does not touch the bottom of your bowl.
  2. Roughly chop the dark and milk chocolates. Place a small quantity of both (in equal measures) in the bowl. Work in batches because chocolate cools fast once taken off the Bain-marie
  3. The steam from the water will melt the chocolate. Stir to mix the two chocolates. Add 1 tbsp cream per batch (you should have roughly 3 batches with the amount of chocolate in this recipe)
  4. Remove melting bowl from the pot once the chocolate starts seizing/ clumping (which will be almost immediately after adding the heavy cream)
  5. While still warm, use a spoon to scoop out a bite-sized portion and hand-roll it
  6. Place a small amount of candied ginger and ground ginger in the centre of the truffle while hand-rolling.
  7. Garnish with sea-salt after placing it on the wax paper while the truffles are still tacky. Dust with cocoa powder for a bitter-sweet after taste
  8. Once cooled, they should hold their shape and can be chilled in the refrigerator layered between wax paper